17/7/2013



1,443 notes

20/11/2012



72 notes
Fake Criterion Cover: DRIVE (Nicolas Winding Refn) 2011art credit

Nino: What do you get out of it? Driver: Just that. Out of it.

Fake Criterion Cover: DRIVE (Nicolas Winding Refn) 2011art credit

Nino: What do you get out of it? 
Driver: Just that. Out of it.

(Source: truthandmovies)

Tagged: Drive,

18/9/2012



A brand new Nightswimming show for Space Invader Radio at 7pm CET (6 UK time) today with all the freshest nudisco & synthpop. Select your player here: http://spaceinvaderradio.com
Strangely no Italians Do It Better bands today, but lots of other goodies and a new tune from Electric Youth written after they watched the movie Drive (singer Bronwyn was the voice on “A Real Hero”): it is dedicated to Ryan Gosling’s character!
If you miss it or you want to listen to it again, the podcast will be on my mixcloud page in a few days with the full playlist.

A brand new Nightswimming show for Space Invader Radio at 7pm CET (6 UK time) today with all the freshest nudisco & synthpop. Select your player here: http://spaceinvaderradio.com

Strangely no Italians Do It Better bands today, but lots of other goodies and a new tune from Electric Youth written after they watched the movie Drive (singer Bronwyn was the voice on “A Real Hero”): it is dedicated to Ryan Gosling’s character!

If you miss it or you want to listen to it again, the podcast will be on my mixcloud page in a few days with the full playlist.

27/6/2012



1 note

Director Laurent Duroche has created NWR, a documentary about director Nicolas Winding Refn.

NWR involves himself a lot in this documentary. He told us about his work’s paradoxes and hidden sides, about his relationship with his family whom he seems to love deeply even if he may have depicted it in an ambiguous way. We have met NWR during the presentation of DRIVE in Cannes, we followed him back to Copenhagen and we’ll soon leave with him to Bangkok where he will direct his next movie ONLY GOD FORGIVES starring Kristin Scott Thomas and Ryan Gosling. The interviewees: Nicholas Refn / Ryan Gosling / Mads Mikkelsen / Liv Corfixen his wife / his family / Gaspar Noé / Alejandro Jodorowsky / the journalists Philippe Rouyer (Positif) , Cédric Delelée (Mad Movies) , Fausto Fasulo (Mad Movies)

(Source: youtube.com)

08/6/2012



2 notes

Chromatics - Tick Of The Clock + Lady (Live @ Madame Jojo’s, London, 05.06.12) (by Andunemir)

29/5/2012



2 notes

Chromatics - “These Streets Will Never Look The Same” DIRECTED BY ALBERTO ROSSINI

Chromatics have flown off to Europe for their first tour since 2010. In celebration, Italians Do It Better and director Alberto Rossini have released the sixth video from the stellar Kill For Love ( Italians Do It Better )

Spent My Life Inside This Room
& Disappeared Some More Each Day
The Screen Stayed Flashing In My Mind
I Couldn’t Run Away From You
You Kept Me Hanging On The LIne
I Get So Lonely All The Time
I Try To Find My Way Back Home
These Streets Will Never Look The Same
My Broken Heart Erased Your Name

(Source: kalamitat)

08/4/2012



4 notes

ratethatalbum: review of CHROMATICS - KILL FOR LOVE

ratethatalbum:

                                                        Chromatics 

                                                       Kill for Love

9.0/10

                                                          Must Listen

I’ve been waiting for this record for five years. And what’s worse than waiting for Chromatics’ followup to 2007’s Night Drive is when the project’s mastermind Johnny Jewel says Kill for Love will drop in January but then it doesn’t. Then on Valentines Day…but then it doesn’t. But the wait was totally worth it: Kill for Love is everything I hoped and wanted from Chromatics. 

The string of five singles the Portland band released were incredibly promising. Last October, the band dropped the title single, which ended up in my top 30 best songs of the year. Chromatics also released a video for their cover of Neil Young’s “Hey Hey My My (Into the Black)” — simply titled “Into the Black.” It’s a daring cover but the band does it justice as they have with other covers like Kate Bush’s “Running Up that Hill” and Bruce Springstein’s haunting “I’m on Fire.”

The band has gotten a larger audience lately thanks the fucking amazing 2011 film Drive. Some of Jewel’s music appeared in the thriller-noir film (including Chromatic’s heart-pumping “Tick of the Clock”). And what didn’t appear in the film apparently ended up on Jewel and label-mate Nat Walker’s breathtaking project Symmetry’s album Themes for an Imaginary Film. Instead of pop songs, the duo focused on emotion and a soundscape of beautiful synths and truly make you feel like living in a movie — and on Kill for Love the same thing happens but it’s not so blatant. 

Like M83, Chromatics draw on thematic elements that evoke raw emotion. While M83 focuses on things that make you feel young or like an angsty teen by the use of lyrics, Chromatic’s nearly use their sound. Just like Night Drive there is a strong sense of cinematic quality here most noticeably on the heartbreaking track “There’s a Light Out on the Horizon”  where a voicemail message of someone’s lover is deleted, all backed by  slick, cool, badass, don’t-give-a-fuck beat. You can just picture someone (Driver) riding in their car in the California desert with the sun slowly sinking down — the person has sunglasses on and just embodies badassness. 

But the more constructed pop songs, like “Return From the Grave” work towards the cinematic aesthetic. The creepiness of all the tracks take the LP into the right direction, especially coming from their last EP In the City. Kill for Love works so well it becomes a soundtrack to its own horror movie within itself. The ambient, drifting but beautiful songs like “The Eleventh Hour,” “Broken Mirrors” and “Running from the Sun” all work magnificently as mood pieces. They also make you appreciate the Chromatic’s pop songs like the mind-blowing “The Page,” and the reworked version of the masterful “Lady.” 

Not one track is a disappointment here. Although “The River” sounds better as Symmetry’s “Streets of FIre” it still holds its own. Even the 15 minute closer “No Escape” is a wonderful cherry on top. But tracks like “Birds of Paradise,” “Candy,” and the robotic/male-lead/auto-tune “These Streets Will Never Look the Same” and the before mentioned well-structured pop songs prove that Chromatics are one of the best bands out there today. 

(Source: isthisandno)

30/3/2012



10 notes
:-)

:-)

20/3/2012



4 notes
Tune in every third Tuesday of the month for one hour of the freshest darkwave, synthpop and nu disco, selected and mixed by me for Space Invader Radio.
Have a fruity cocktail (little umbrella optional) and tune in at 7 CET (6 UK time) every third Tuesday of the month. Choose your player at the link.
Full podcast and playlist up on my mixcloud.
Enjoy.

Tune in every third Tuesday of the month for one hour of the freshest darkwave, synthpop and nu disco, selected and mixed by me for Space Invader Radio.

Have a fruity cocktail (little umbrella optional) and tune in at 7 CET (6 UK time) every third Tuesday of the month. Choose your player at the link.

Full podcast and playlist up on my mixcloud.

Enjoy.

27/2/2012



1,829 notes

JoBlo pays an Oscar-style tribute to the actors, actresses, films and film make-possiblers who weren’t nominated for an Academy Award but should have been. This is Snubbed 2012.

HA! :-D

(this is good, watch it)

(Source: thedailywhat)

09/2/2012



5 notes

Kavinsky - Roadgame

from the new album
More:
www.myspace.com/kavinsky
fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kavinsky

07/2/2012



1 note
Tagged: Drive,

28/1/2012



1 note

23/12/2011



22 notes

Symmetry - Themes For An Imaginary Film by Johnny Jewel on Italian Do It Better Records is OUT ON ITUNES TODAY! (in hard copy at the beginning of 2012)
Total Driving Time: 2 Hours 37 Seconds

Three years in the making, Symmetry - the project that began as a conceptual tangent between Glass Candy, Chromatics, Mirage, & Desire’s more abstract sides - finally sees its release this month. Themes For An Imaginary Film is two hours of claustrophobic cinematic bliss compiled for Painters, Writers, Photographers, Designers, Cruisers, Night Walkers, & Dreamers. Adrenaline drips thick like syrup across a horizon where memories become blurred scenes behind the windshield & yesterday’s faces fade as the road strobes to aggressive rhythms. Romantic melodies linger in the rearview mirror as chimera bells saturate the electric fog that’s slowly rolling in.

Over the span of thirty seven tracks, Symmetry embraces the elegance of European noir cut with a lean & violent American razor. Directly in your face & breathing down your neck one minute, & escaping beyond the night sky the next. The attention given to color & detail on these recordings is more graphic than musical. More visual than aural. With no flashy virtuosity to clutter the mood, the album’s pulse thrives on the empty pockets of space left in the wake of throbbing bass & the faint flicker of electro candlelight. Minimal, strict, & always in motion, there’s an oppressive overtone throughout the record that winds itself tight as a clock. Johnny Jewel & Nat Walker (Chromatics & Desire) give us propulsive moments that are more rhythm based than Pop, & less reliant on a lyrical presence than their other projects.

A lot of computer screens have flashed rumors of Jewel’s synthesized score for Nicolas Refn’s Drive this year. Symmetry isn’t his score for Drive. These tracks date back to 2008 when Jewel was working on Farah’s Into Eternity album. Some of the other tracks are the first things Jewel & Walker worked on in Montreal before Desire was up & running, & while Chromatics was in hiding after the success of Night Drive. As Jewel says: “We were just spending all night in a trance with not enough sleep, exploring space, rhythm & tone.”

With repetitions in theme like hi hats dressed as stopwatches, and bass lines mimicking the pumping of blood, the statement of Symmetry is in the understatement. Dueling themes permeate & mirror the entire album. Feminine / Masculine. Space / Density. Bass / Treble. Tension / Release. Love / Isolation. Taking cues in texture & ambiance from Amercian composers John Cage, Morton Feldman, & Glenn Branca, while applying the more cascading & visual concepts of European composers Maurice Ravel, Gyorgy Ligeti, Erik Satie, & Karlheinz Stockhausen. We hear all of these elements through the veil & color of analog synthesizers & rhythm machines from the early 1970s, resulting in the suspenseful & patient territory pioneered by the hands of John Carpenter, Claudio Simonetti, Wendy Carlos, Klaus Schulze, & Krzysztof Komeda. Symmetry is not Pop. Stripped it to its most primitive & visceral core, this is music written for picture. Your life is the film & this is the soundtrack.

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