25/2/2013



11 notes
“I was here fifteen years ago or something and, you know, I had no idea what I was doing. I was sitting out here in front of you all and I was really just a kid. And I went out and I never really thought I would be back here, and I am because of so many of you who are here tonight, because of this Academy, because of so many wonderful people who extended themselves to me when they had nothing to benefit from it in Hollywood. You know what I mean? I couldn’t get them a job. I want to thank them and I want to thank what they taught me, which is that you have to work harder than you think you possibly can, you can’t hold grudges. It’s hard, but you can’t hold grudges. Uh, and it doesn’t matter, uh, how you get knocked down in life because that’s going to happen. All that matters is that you gotta get up.”

from Ben Affleck’s speech, winning Best Movie at 2013 Oscars (via Marya)

17:56



Tagged: oscars,

24/2/2013



710 notes
Cary Grant receiving an Academy Honorary Award in 1970 (online here)
“Years ago, when Cary Grant and Dyan Cannon were getting divorced, a perhaps apocryphal story appeared in the scandal sheets: As an example of Grant’s supposed irrationality, Cannon cited to the judge Cary’s yearly habit of sitting in front of his television and sardonically abusing all the participants. This item, true or not, must have amused nearly everyone in Hollywood, since nearly everyone in Hollywood does pretty much the same thing. 
The funny thing is that from all accounts, when the Academy Awards began in 1939, they were conducted in a similar spirit of irreverence, something that has practically disappeared from the event itself. “They used to have it down at the old Coconut Grove,” Jimmy Stewart told me in the late 70s. “You’d have dinner and alawta drinks - the whole thing was…it was just…it was a party. Nobody took it all that seriously. I mean, it was swell if ya won because your friends were givin’ it to you, but it didn’t mean anything at the bawx office or anything. It was just alawta friends gettin’ together and tellin’ some jokes and gettin’ loaded and givin’ out some little prizes. My gawsh, it was..there was no pressure or anything like that.”
Cary Grant corroborated this to me: ”It was a private affair, you see - no television, no radio, even - just a group of friends giving each other a party. Because, you know, there is something a little embarrassing about all these wealthy people publicly congratulating each other. When it began, we kidded ourselves: ‘All right, Freddie March,’ we’d say, ‘we know you’re making a million dollars - now come up and get your little medal for it!’”
-excerpted from Peter Bogdanovich’s Who the Hell’s In It

Cary Grant receiving an Academy Honorary Award in 1970 (online here)

“Years ago, when Cary Grant and Dyan Cannon were getting divorced, a perhaps apocryphal story appeared in the scandal sheets: As an example of Grant’s supposed irrationality, Cannon cited to the judge Cary’s yearly habit of sitting in front of his television and sardonically abusing all the participants. This item, true or not, must have amused nearly everyone in Hollywood, since nearly everyone in Hollywood does pretty much the same thing. 

The funny thing is that from all accounts, when the Academy Awards began in 1939, they were conducted in a similar spirit of irreverence, something that has practically disappeared from the event itself. “They used to have it down at the old Coconut Grove,” Jimmy Stewart told me in the late 70s. “You’d have dinner and alawta drinks - the whole thing was…it was just…it was a party. Nobody took it all that seriously. I mean, it was swell if ya won because your friends were givin’ it to you, but it didn’t mean anything at the bawx office or anything. It was just alawta friends gettin’ together and tellin’ some jokes and gettin’ loaded and givin’ out some little prizes. My gawsh, it was..there was no pressure or anything like that.”

Cary Grant corroborated this to me: ”It was a private affair, you see - no television, no radio, even - just a group of friends giving each other a party. Because, you know, there is something a little embarrassing about all these wealthy people publicly congratulating each other. When it began, we kidded ourselves: ‘All right, Freddie March,’ we’d say, ‘we know you’re making a million dollars - now come up and get your little medal for it!’”

-excerpted from Peter Bogdanovich’s Who the Hell’s In It

(Source: oldhollywood)

Tagged: Cary Grant, oscars,

17:00



32 notes
welcometothebathtub: Host a Bathtub worthy Oscar Party and join Beasts across the globe as we #Beastit ! http://bit.ly/12Gm4Oz

welcometothebathtub: Host a Bathtub worthy Oscar Party and join Beasts across the globe as we #Beastit ! http://bit.ly/12Gm4Oz

12/2/2013



1 note
Tagged: Olly Moss, Oscars, poster,

22/1/2013



529 notes
Christian Dior Spring 2013 Haute Couture See the full collection and review.
Haute couture presentations just in time for Oscars night! I am in love with this creation, dunno if Zoe Saldana is invited but I would like her to give it a try :-)
The poufy coral model above should go to someone a bit quirky who could appreciate it, like Michelle Williams (with heels)

Christian Dior Spring 2013 Haute Couture See the full collection and review.

Haute couture presentations just in time for Oscars night! I am in love with this creation, dunno if Zoe Saldana is invited but I would like her to give it a try :-)

The poufy coral model above should go to someone a bit quirky who could appreciate it, like Michelle Williams (with heels)

(via vogue)

Tagged: Dior, Oscars, fashion,

28/2/2012



24 notes
Robert Redford at the 1981 Academy Awards, where he received the Best Director Oscar for his work on Ordinary People (1980), his directorial debut.

Robert Redford at the 1981 Academy Awards, where he received the Best Director Oscar for his work on Ordinary People (1980), his directorial debut.

(Source: redfordmcqueenandnewman, via fuckyeahnewmanandredford)

27/2/2012



8 notes
“When they called me I had this feeling I could hear half of America going ‘Oh no. Oh come on why? Her. Again?’ You know. But, whatever.”

— Meryl Streep winning her Academy Award last night

19:43



127 notes

19:39



2,008 notes
ha :-D

ha :-D

(Source: xxlittlethoughts)

19:15



1,834 notes

JoBlo pays an Oscar-style tribute to the actors, actresses, films and film make-possiblers who weren’t nominated for an Academy Award but should have been. This is Snubbed 2012.

HA! :-D

(this is good, watch it)

(Source: thedailywhat)

17:58



1 note

“The Artist” Wins Best Picture at 84th Academy Awards

The ones I was rooting for weren’t even nominated (Drive, Hanna, There Must Be The Place, Michael Fassbender in anything),  but here we are with the list:

(via cinemafanatic)

Best Picture:
The Artist
The Descendants
Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close
The Help
Hugo
Midnight in Paris
Moneyball
The Tree of Life
War Horse

Best Director:
Michel Hazanavicius – The Artist
Alexander Payne – The Descendants
Martin Scorsese – Hugo
Woody Allen – Midnight in Paris
Terrence Malick – The Tree of Life

Best Actor:
Jean Dujardin – The Artist
Demián Bichir – A Better Life
George Clooney – The Descendants
Brad Pitt – Moneyball
Gary Oldman – Tinker, Tailor, Soldier, Spy

Best Actress:
Glenn Close – Albert Nobbs
Rooney Mara – The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo
Viola Davis – The Help
Meryl Streep – The Iron Lady
Michelle Williams – My Week With Marilyn

Best Supporting Actor:
Christopher Plummer – Beginners
Max Von Sydow – Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close
Jonah Hill – Moneyball
Kenneth Branagh – My Week with Marilyn
Nick Nolte – Warrior

Best Supporting Actress
Janet McTeer – Albert Nobbs
Bérénice Bejo – The Artist
Melissa McCarthy – Bridesmaids
Jessica Chastain – The Help
Octavia Spencer – The Help

Best Animated Feature
A Cat In Paris
Chico and Rita
Kung Fu Panda 2
Puss In Boots
Rango

Best Adapted Screenplay:
The Descendants – Alexander Payne and Nat Faxon & Jim Rash
Hugo – John Logan
The Ides of March – George Clooney and Grant Heslov
Moneyball – Aaron Sorkin, Steven Zaillian and Stan Chervin
Tinker, Tailor, Soldier, Spy – Bridget O’Connor and Peter Straughn

Best Original Screenplay:
The Artist – Michel Hazanavicius
Bridesmaids – Kristen Wiig and Annie Mumolo
Margin Call – JC Chandor
Midnight In Paris – Woody Allen
A Separation – Asghar Farhadi

Best Foreign Film
A Separation (Iran)
In Darkness (Poland)
Footnote (Israel)
Bullhead (Belgium)
Monsieur Lazhar (Canada)

Best Art Direction
The Artist
Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows Part 2
Hugo
Midnight In Paris
War Horse

Best Cinematography
The Artist – Guillaume Schiffman
The Girl With The Dragon Tattoo – Jeff Cronenweth
Hugo – Robert Richardson
The Tree of Life – Emmanuel Lubezki
War Horse – Janusz Kaminiski

Best Costume Design
Anonymous – Lisy Christl
The Artist – Mark Bridges
Hugo – Sandy Powell
Jane Eyre – Michael O’Connor
W.E. – Arianne Phillips

Best Film Editing
The Artist – Anne-Sophie Bion and Michel Hazanavicius
The Descendants – Kevin Tent
The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo – Kirk Baxter and Angus Wall
Hugo – Thelma Schoonmaker
Moneyball – Christopher Tellefsen

Best Makeup
Albert Nobbs
Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows Part 2
The Iron Lady

Best Score
The Adventures of Tintin – John Williams
The Artist – Ludovic Bource
Hugo – Howard Shore
Tinker Tailor Soldier Spy – Alberto Iglesias
War Horse – John Williams

Best Original Song
Man or Muppet from The Muppets – Music and Lyric by Bret McKenzie
Real in Rio from Rio – Music by Sergio Mendes and Carlinhos Brown Lyric by Siedah Garrett

Best Short Film (Animated)
Dimanche/Sunday – Patrick Doyon
The Fantastic Flying Books of Mr. Morris Lessmore – William Joyce and Brandon Oldenburg
La Luna – Enrico Casarosa
A Morning Stroll – Grant Orchard and Sue Goffe
Wild Life – Amanda Forbis and Wendy Tilby

Best Short Film (Live Action)
Pentecost – Peter McDonald and Eimear O’Kane
Raju – Max Zähle and Stefan Gieren
The Shore – Terry George and Oorlagh George
Time Freak – Andrew Bowler and Gigi Causey
Tuba Atlantic – Hallvar Witzø

Best Sound Editing
Drive – Lon Bender and Victor Ray Ennis
The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo – Ren Klyce
Hugo – Philip Stockton and Eugene Gearty
Transformers: Dark of the Moon – Ethan Van der Ryn and Erik Aadahl
War Horse – Richard Hymns and Gary Rydstrom

Best Sound Mixing
The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo – David Parker, Michael Semanick, Ren Klyce and Bo Persson
Hugo – Tom Fleischman and John Midgley
Moneyball – Deb Adair, Ron Bochar, Dave Giammarco and Ed Novick
Transformers: Dark of the Moon – Greg P. Russell, Gary Summers, Jeffrey J. Haboush and Peter J. Devlin
War Horse – Gary Rydstrom, Andy Nelson, Tom Johnson and Stuart Wilson

Visual Effects
Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows Part 2 – Tim Burke, David Vickery, Greg Butler and John Richardson
Hugo – Rob Legato, Joss Williams, Ben Grossman and Alex Henning
Real Steel – Erik Nash, John Rosengrant, Dan Taylor and Swen Gillberg
Rise of the Planet of the Apes – Joe Letteri, Dan Lemmon, R. Christopher White and Daniel Barrett
Transformers: Dark of the Moon – Scott Farrar, Scott Benza, Matthew Butler and John Frazier

Tagged: The Artist, oscars, lists,

26/2/2012



Tagged: oscars,

07/2/2012



16 notes
Gary Oldman, Jean Dujardin, Demian Bichir, Brad Pitt and George Clooney  attend the 84th Academy Awards Nominations Luncheon  on February 6, 2012

Gary Oldman, Jean Dujardin, Demian Bichir, Brad Pitt and George Clooney attend the 84th Academy Awards Nominations Luncheon  on February 6, 2012

26/1/2012



1 note
Tagged: oscars, lists,

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